Letters from Mars

My high school reunion is this weekend, and it has involved, among other things, sushi, sex toys, and watching people play video games. So it’s pretty much exactly like high school.

shadowen:

The important items from this story?

  • Suicide Squad – 08/05/16 (One notable member is Amanda Waller, a Black woman of size.)
  • Wonder Woman – 06/23/17 (starring Israeli actress Gal Gadot)
  • Aquaman – 07/27/18 (starring Native Hawaiian actor Jason Momoa)
  • Shazam – 04/05/19 (featuring Dwayne Johnson as Black Adam)
  • Cyborg – 04/03/20 (if I need to tell you why this is cool, I’m sorry for your life. Also, Ray Fisher is Cyborg.)

So over the next five years, DC/Warner Bros. has promised us at least five films starring or featuring women and actors of color. Mark this date and hold them to it.

ETA: I have also learned that The Flash, set to premier 03/23/18 and starring Ezra Miller, will mark the first time that an openly queer actor will play the title lead in a superhero film. So that’s also cool.

allofthefeelings:

billyteddy:

like if you’re honestly bitter that wonder woman is getting a solo film before marvel announces a solo film that’s fine i’m also bitter that marvel hasn’t announced a female solo film either but don’t be mad at dc or at wonder woman and especially don’t be mad at the fans that are happy that wonder woman is finally getting her own movie

be mad at kevin feige who says it’s “not time” for a female solo be mad at marvel but don’t take your anger out unfairly on a character who seeks justice, who embodies compassion and strength and who is a steadfast immovable intersectional feminist icon

100% this, especially because it’s playing into exactly what we fight against.

Stop pitting women against women. Stop making it a contest for which single woman is good enough in a room of men. Embrace all women. Welcome all women.

I hope Wonder Woman’s box office take makes Avengers look like Elektra.

theactualcluegirl:

wintercyan:

jenngeek:

it took me a moment to figure out Kate’s costume BUT WHEN I DID.

theactualcluegirl:

wintercyan:

jenngeek:

it took me a moment to figure out Kate’s costume BUT WHEN I DID.

image

I just finished the first draft of the first issue for OASIS, the SF western comic I’m doing with qludwigart, and I’m having a moment of oh my god this is a real thing. So I’m giving myself a second to internally freak out and feel like an actual tru fax writer with a future career and shit. The learning curve on writing comics vs writing prose is so huge, and I’ve been struggling a lot with finding my rhythm in a totally different medium. There’s still a long way to go before I get to hold a comic in my hands, but having made this one tangible step forward, after more than a year of planning and making notes, makes the rest of the road look a lot less like an uphill battle.

This is me taking a deep breath and giving myself a round of applause. Now back to work.

bastardplanet:

singh64:

dangercupcakemurdericing:

singh64:

lgbtqblogs:

I am a white gay dad of two African-American kids as well, and I can surely relate to the feelings of these men in an intimate way. But, honestly, I am taken aback by the commercial, and not only because André and Jonathan are selling an intimate story of a life-changing personal event to a corporation to promote a breakfast product but because, more problematically, the commercial completely glosses over of the more profound dimensions of adoption. Adoption is often rooted in dark social situations and debilitating personal circumstances: poverty, racism, mental and physical illness, restrictive social mores and so forth. There is a reason that the men’s child is black, and it’s connected with how our society deals with issues in communities of color, here and abroad.

The commercial — and we must remember that it is a commercial, not a mini-documentary — spends just one short moment communicating some awareness of the other party in adoption, the first family, when one of the men speaks about the “risk she [the child] can go back in her biological family,” referring to the days or weeks after the adoption in which the biological mother is legally allowed to change her mind. The men immediately follow the acknowledgment of that “risk” with an expression of relief that that didn’t happen, saying, rather inarticulately, “Now she is really cool. She has love. She has confidence.” The reference to the first family is in fact not about that family but about the fears of the adoptive parents.

I wish this commercial were an isolated incident, but many representations of infant adoptions in gay and mainstream media are just as one-sided. There is a happy website, Gays With Kids, which shows mainly good adoptive-parent news stories. The LGBT advocacy organization Family Equality Council has the slogan “Love. Justice. Family. Equality,” but it appears that they’re only concerned about justice and equality for adoptive families and not for first families. The larger LGBT organization Human Rights Campaign has on its website a blog post titled “8 Questions to Ask Before Starting the Adoption Process" that doesn’t include any consideration of where these adoptable kids actually come from.

As a gay father, I find it hard to understand why a highly successful social movement, one rooted in social activism and focused on real change, is just as conservative as the rest of our mainly straight society where adoption is concerned. It seems that many gay men, like many straight couples and single parents, don’t want to see the bigger picture of adoption, a picture in which the first parents are seriously represented, their plight and perspectives acknowledged and regarded as prompts for social activism. Adopting a black child like André and Jonathan have done comes with an obligation to the family and the community of which the child was and still is a part. How to fulfill that obligation is a personal choice, but in my view, lying back and enjoying “normal” family life is not an option. I never regarded being gay as “normal,” and I don’t regard my “gay fatherhood” as “normal” either.

The little cheerio that floats in a bowl of milk to two already-together cheerios is a false image of adoption — and of human relationships, for that matter — since no person is ever an island. Every adopted child is connected to a multitude of others who are in fact visible outside the constructed world of a touching and brilliantly made if frustrating commercial.

Well as it relates to being normal, i think the commercial is showing what everything should be and what we should fight for, but the part where he talks about the impact it will have on the first family and where the child comes from has me confused. I was under the impression that when children are put up for adoption it is either because their birth parent(s) are incapable of caring for them or they don’t have anyone to care for them and giving up all rights to them (thus being adopted by a loving family is better than not) and well the second part just plain out confuses me. Does he mean child trafficking or something? Or am I just misunderstanding the whole thing?

Might I direct you to Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare, @bastardplanet and the The Donaldson Adoption Institute. Read some of the reports Native and Black organizations are putting out about the fostercare and adoption systems. Read about the Evangelical adoption crusade. Read about “rehoming” and “rebirthing.”

The adoption system is wicked racist, ableist, classist and imperialist and it would really behoove white queer people to look at the system they’re fighting for the right to participate in. There is a shit load of straight up child trafficking in adoption and that’s not getting into the coercive elements of the system. Adoption is an industry and that absolutely must change.

It is really not as simple as teenage girls who don’t want to be mothers finding nice white families for their babies, or abusive parents having their children removed. And just to head this off at the pass, no one wants to see children stay in abusive situations or institutions. No one wants to force a parent to keep an unwanted child.

For context I’m speaking as transracial adoptee, although my parents are straight, I’m not. I was a “voluntary” relinquishment.

Huh. Didn’t expect that. Although I still keep seeing it as better to adopt a kid than have my own if I ever want any. Why can’t things just be as simple as they look?

When an actual transracial adoptee like @dangercupcakemurdericing takes the time to politely inform you at length that the entire adoption system is racist, ableist, classist, and imperialist, and the only complaint you have about a grossly oppressive child trafficking industry is "why can’t things just as be as simply as they look," then there’s something wrong with you.

Of course selfish bio spawn always maintain that adoption is “better” even when confronted with its oppressive reality. That’s because you’re willfully ignorant and only care about yourself, it’s clear you have no awareness or genuine concern for actual adoptees, much less our birth families. You would not make a good adoptive parent.

reblog if u are a LESBIAN, support LESBIANS, or are an ANGRY SPACE WITCH THAT IS TIRED OF THE BOURGEOISIE

The important items from this story?

  • Suicide Squad – 08/05/16 (One notable member is Amanda Waller, a Black woman of size.)
  • Wonder Woman – 06/23/17 (starring Israeli actress Gal Gadot)
  • Aquaman – 07/27/18 (starring Native Hawaiian actor Jason Momoa)
  • Shazam – 04/05/19 (featuring Dwayne Johnson as Black Adam)
  • Cyborg – 04/03/20 (if I need to tell you why this is cool, I’m sorry for your life. Also, Ray Fisher is Cyborg.)

So over the next five years, DC/Warner Bros. has promised us at least five films starring or featuring women and actors of color. Mark this date and hold them to it.

the perfect boyfriend problem

We’ve all read the story. Character A is broken and alone, damaged by life, convinced that no one will ever love them. Enter Character B to show Character A all the kindness and generosity they’ve never had. Character A is uncertain, thinks it must be temporary or a ploy to lure them into complacency, and they probably lash out. Character B is unfailingly patient and continues to care for Character A, never showing anger or resentment, without any clear incentive or indication that the situation will improve. They fall in love and probably bone. There is some kind of conflict that brings them closer together, and they live happily ever after.

Order of events may vary, but I bet everyone reading this can think of at least five fics that follow that formula, just off the top of your head. If you’re a Clint/Coulson fan, you can probably think of more. In fact, if you’re a Clint/Coulson fan, depending on your preferences, fics like this probably make up a sizeable portion of your reading, which is absolutely one hundred percent totally fine. You’re entitled to read and enjoy whatever you like. Go for it.

The people I need to have a word with are the ones writing those stories. You know who you are.

I want to make it clear that I’m not calling anyone out. This isn’t a criticism of anyone’s writing or stories, or even a commentary on the tropes and formula. This a critique of a problematic characterization that is unfortunately common in C/C fandom.

Phil Coulson: Perfect Boyfriend

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uncontinuous:

*cracks knuckles* All right, let’s talk about the one episode badass wondrous warrior that is Akela Amador and why she is so incredibly important.

(Fair Warning: This may devolve into nonsensical crying but I really love Akela a lot.)

Her intro scene. I’m sorry but it’s incredibly badass, and I swooned as I rightfully should’ve, and so should you. Akela Amador is a goddamn certified badass.

Next, we learn that SHIELD has a certain type of soldiers they have a lot off - the lone, doesn’t play well with others, antihero. And SHIELD tries to socialise them into being team players. This? Is a type reserved solely for white men in fiction. And by alone being a part of this group, Akela Amador subverts this. And we’re still starting to get to know Akela Amador. Gosh I’m in love already.

Okay but hey the team is still after her, so she’s the bad gu— wait what’s this? Coulson first wants to find out her reasons before taking action against her? You mean the White Male Protagonist is actually giving a Woman, A Non White Woman a chance to explain her actions?

Okay we’ll probably find out she’s a traitor and be done with that and move onto White Male Protagonist angst over not seeing this coming. I mean she’s already done something unforgivable and Melinda has gone after her— wait no what do you mean we’re giving her a backstory aND NOT VILLAINISING HER? WHAT DO MEAN WE’RE NOT KILLING HER? What do you mean we’re talking about giving her second chances?

She was experimented upon against her will and is being controlled and is trying to survive, and is still willing to take responsibility for her actions instead of using it as an excuse - OH MY GOSH MY BABY COME HERE TO ME.YOU DON’T NEED NO REDEMPTION ARC. LET ME KEEP YOU SAFE FOREVER.

AND THEY MANAGE TO ACTUALLY SAVE HER AT THE END, OH GOSH MY HEART.

AND FINALLY THAT LAST SHOT OF AKELA SLEEPING PEACEFULLY FOR THE FIRST TIME IN MAYBE YEARS.

Akela Amador actually got a story, got redeemed, and didn’t get killed but a peaceful ending, do you know how rare that is?

But more than that, she’s dealt with losing her team, being taken in by a Nazi organisation off shoot, being experimented upon against her will, used as a super soldier for that organisation. She’s probably dealing with years of PTSD and trauma, and so much more. And she finally gets what she wants at the end. A simple wish to just rest.

Akela Amador is a paragon of intersectional representation too. She’s black, a woman, a soldier, someone who definitely has ptsd and other trauma issues due to what she went through, and as of the end of the episode she even counts as disabled. And we give her a peaceful ending instead of turning her into canon fodder.

Akela Amador is incredibly important and deserves all the happiness and healing and fluffy warm comfy things ever.